Do you know that eating carrots will improve your eye sight is a myth????

 

 Image result for carrots ww2

Eating carrots will improve your eyesight – is a myth that was created to defeat the Nazis.

Sure, carrots are enriched with Vitamin A which is important in maintaining healthy eyes but the idea of carrots noticably improving vision, is a smartly crafted myth.

In 1940, during the second world war, German forces frequently bombed England during the night time. England’s Air force retaliated and was more successful in terms of number of kills made in the dark.

The reason British ministry of Information stated for its immense success was – carrots.

They stated that their pilots were made to eat sufficient amount of carrots, which drastically improved their vision and helped them to see the enemy aircraft beforehand and attack them in the dark.

To make their story more believable, the British Ministry started a campaign that encouraged civilians to do all they could to support the war, and that meant growing their own food, including carrots. Several carrot recipes were handed out across England to help people make the most of their carrot supplies. So it would seem logical that eating all these carrots could be helping the pilots who were flying in defense of the country to spot the enemy sooner.

The carrot story was just a cover for what the British pilots were really using – Radar. Radar technology was being fitted to RAF planes – which put them to advantage, and the military certainly didn’t want the Germans finding out about it.

It is not known/proven if the Germans took the bait, but what is known is – the Englishmen did.

The British government had issued orders for city-wide blackouts to prevent the German bombers from easily targeting important places and buildings. So it wasn’t just the pilots that needed a way to see in the dark, it was civilians, too—and carrots were going to give it to them.

And that gave birth to this fact (Myth?) that carrots improve night vision – which is still a widely accepted belief, decades after the conclusion of the war.

Source

 

 

 

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